In the News: Employer thievery; Maddow beats Fox; Why Trump will quit

 

We thank Jeff Wiggins for sending us these stories.

By DAVID COOPER

Economic Policy Institute

What this report finds: This report assesses the prevalence and magnitude of one form of wage theft—minimum wage violations (workers being paid at an effective hourly rate below the binding minimum wage)—in the 10 most populous U.S. states. We find that, in these states, 2.4 million workers lose $8 billion annually (an average of $3,300 per year for year-round workers) to minimum wage violations—nearly a quarter of their earned wages. This form of wage theft affects 17 percent of low-wage workers, with workers in all demographic categories being cheated out of pay.

Why it matters: Minimum wage violations, by definition, affect the lowest-wage workers—those who can least afford to lose earnings. This form of wage theft causes many families to fall below the poverty line, and it increases workers’ reliance on public assistance, costing taxpayers money. Lost wages can hurt state and local economies, and it hurts other workers in affected industries by putting downward pressure on wages.

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By JASON EASLEY

Politicususa

On Wednesday night, MSNBC's The Rachel Maddow Show drew more viewers than every other primetime program to become the most watched broadcast on cable news.

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By BRENT BUDOWSKI

The Hill

The decision to name the universally-respected former FBI Director Robert Mueller as special counsel on the Russian election scandal is a defining moment in modern American history that sets off a chain reaction that probably leads to the ultimate resignation of President Trump.

On Feb. 15, I wrote an op-ed in The Hill titled, "Putingate is our Watergate." It was true then. It is true now. The Putingate scandal will probably end the same way the Watergate scandal ended, with a presidential resignation followed by a pardon.

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