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On this day in 1955, the AFL and CIO gathered at our first joint convention. Sixty-four years later, the AFL-CIO has so much to be proud of.

By BERRY CRAIG

AFT Local 1360

At least Gov. Bevin is consistent. 

Kentucky State AFL-CIO Executive Board Member Donna Haynes, IBEW Local 1701, presented state AFL-CIO President Bill Londrigan a silver tray in appreciation for the state AFL-CIO helping sponsor las

Thanks to Jeff Wiggins for sending us this.

General Motors Co.’s decision to slash production in three states is a slap in the face to every worker and community who supported the company through its financial crisis. The entire labor movement stands in solidarity with our brothers and sisters at the UAW, and we will fight this decision with everything we’ve got.

GM’s decision to stop production in Michigan, Ohio and Maryland is a gut punch to the American workers who sacrificed and stood by the company to bring it back to profitability. We will fight this corporate greed and outsourcing with our brothers and sisters at the UAW. In the face of overwhelming selfishness and hypocrisy, solidarity among all working people will be our most powerful tool for the fight ahead. -- AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka

By BERRY CRAIG

AFT Local 1360

Kentucky State AFL-CIO President Bill Londrigan will be presented with the Anne Braden Lifetime Achievement Award from the Kentucky Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression at the organization's annual Unity Dinner on Dec. 14 in Louisville.

"I would appreciate the support and participation of our union family at this event," Londrigan said. "We have worked alongside The Kentucky Alliance for many years, recognizing that union rights and civil rights go hand in hand."

Last year, the president said people in Ohio shouldn’t sell their houses because the jobs were coming back.

By ARTHUR DELANEY

Tommy Wolikow remembers the day he became a Donald Trump supporter.

By ELEANOR KLIBANOFF

On what would have been her 43rd wedding anniversary, Lisa Hobbs stood in the front yard of Camp Pius, the farm handed down through her husband's family for generations. She watched as the very same dump truck that killed her husband rolled down her country lane.

In December 2016, Pius "Gene" Hobbs was raking gravel with the Meade County public works crew when a dump truck backed over him. The driver then accelerated forward, hitting him a second time. Hobbs was crushed to death.

 

Thanks to Jeff Wiggins for sending us this.

Working people in unions value the hard work and craftsmanship that goes into the products and services

By BERRY CRAIG

AFT Local 1360

The centennial of the Battle of Blair Mountain, "the largest armed uprising on American soil since the Civil War," won't come around until 2021. 

But folks at the West Virginia Mine Wars Museum in Matewan--as in the movie--are already making plans for the 100th anniversary commemoration.